Anchor Lester Holt, of “NBC Nightly News,” appeared selective when it came to condemning “superspreader moments” as the nation hit the grim milestone of 250,000 coronavirus deaths. 

When he closed Wednesday evening’s broadcast, Holt offered a somber address to viewers regarding the American lives that were lost during the pandemic and questioned whether those who are following CDC guidelines and taking extra precautions to prevent the spread of the virus should be “mad” at those who aren’t. 

“As we cross the quarter-million mark of those we’ve lost to [COVID-19] in this country, we are finding ourselves going through a familiar ritual; a shake of the head, a deep sigh, and a sense of helplessness,” Holt said. “But after that, what’s left? Maybe anger.” 

CNN DOESN’T SOUND ALARM OF COVID ‘SUPERSPREADERS’ AS THOUSANDS CELEBRATE BIDEN WIN IN THE STREETS 

Holt questioned whether the deaths of more than 250,000 people give permission to be angry at superspreader events. Meanwhile, the network was broadcasting images from last weekend’s “Million MAGA March” in Washington during which supporters of President Trump gathered to protest the results of the presidential election and a photograph of Notre Dame fans who stormed the field earlier this month after a stunning win over Clemson University. 

“Surely we know better by now,” he said. “How about anger at those who refuse to wear masks or still cling to denial?”

The comment was paired with an image of what appeared to be an anti-lockdown protest. 

What was missing from Holt’s montage of “superspreader moments” were the thousands that gathered in cities throughout the country who celebrated the projected victory of President-elect Joe Biden and the Black Lives Matter protests that have taken place during the past six months. 

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Between interviews with a man whose father and grandfather died from the coronavirus, a medical frontline worker and struggling business owner, Holt told viewers: “Anger isn’t serving us well because Americans keep dying. We’re losing people and our collective strength. When’s the last time you’ve heard, ‘We’re all in this together?’ 

“We are all clawing for equilibrium, our businesses, our schools, and, above all, our very lives. Maybe it’s time to turn that mad into resolve to beat this virus before it beats us,” Holt concluded. 

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